Post Archive

April 2015

Gay marriage: Justices feel weight of history

Why us? Why now? The justices of the Supreme Court asked those most poignant questions over and over during this week’s arguments about same-sex marriage. 

WASHINGTON, DC - APRIL 21: House Speaker John Boehner (R-OH) and House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi (D-CA) attend a reception in the Rose Garden at the White House April 21, 2015 in Washington, DC. President Obama hosted a reception for members of Congress and supporters of H.R. 2, the Medicare Access and CHIP Reauthorization Act of 2015 to thank them for the bi-partisan legislation. (Photo by Mark Wilson/Getty Images)

Don’t break out the champagne or the choruses of “Kumbaya” quite yet, but Congress is actually starting to get a few things done.

Baltimore Police officers arrest a man near Mowdamin Mall, April 27, 2015, in Baltimore, Maryland. The funeral service for Freddie Gray, who died last week while in Baltimore Police custody, was held on Monday morning. (Photo by Drew Angerer/Getty Images)

The still mysterious death of Freddie Gray while in the custody of the Baltimore Police raises an obvious question.

Representatives from the Human Rights Campaign deliver an amicus brief and accompanying signatures in support of same-sex marriage to the U.S. Supreme Court March 6, 2015, in Washington, D.C. The court is considering six cases from four states on the issue of marriage equality. (Photo by Win McNamee/Getty Images)

Host Andrea Seabrook examines the most powerful moments from this week’s same-sex marriage hearing.

WASHINGTON, DC - APRIL 28: Protesters hold pro-gay rights flags outside the US Supreme Court on April 28, 2015 in Washington, DC. The Supreme Court meets to hear arguments whether same-sex couples have a constitutional right to wed in the United States, with a final decision expected in June. (Photo by Olivier Douliery/Getty Images)

Historic case will determine the future of same-sex marriage across the country.

WASHINGTON, DC - APRIL 28: Protesters hold pro-gay rights flags outside the US Supreme Court on April 28, 2015 in Washington, DC. The Supreme Court meets to hear arguments whether same-sex couples have a constitutional right to wed in the United States, with a final decision expected in June. (Photo by Olivier Douliery/Getty Images)

A little thing called marriage is about to have a big day in court. On Tuesday, the U.S. Supreme Court will hear arguments on state

Pete Prete of Equality Beyond Gender holds a "marriage pride flag" outside the U.S. Supreme Court January 9, 2015, in Washington, D.C.  (Photo by Alex Wong/Getty Images)

The idea that acceptance of gay marriage is more an act of culture peace than culture war is worth following.

Although many speculated that Rand Paul would carry on his father's brand of libertarianism, the younger Paul and his father, Ron, diverge in policy and other areas. (Illustration by Liz Scheltens/DecodeDC)

Even before his April 7 announcement, there was speculation as to whether Kentucky Sen. Rand Paul would inherit his father’s supporters for his 2016 bid.

A 78-year-old retired Iowa farmer and state legislator was accused of a felony sexual assault of his wife. The details of the case were obviously very important in the courtroom. But for thinking about the general ethical and legal issues that will certainly come up more in aging (and Viagra-buying) population, a few specifics are salient.

Philosophically, this is a fascinating story. Emotionally, it’s sad. Ideally, it shouldn’t be in the news.

I'm disheartened by the politicians, polemicists, self-help gurus and preachers who say they have the answers.

‘It’s the sides of the mountain which sustain life, not the top.’

It’s Mother Earth’s birthday Wednesday, which for some means giving back to the environment, enjoying the great outdoors and doing whatever you can to clean up the planet. But for some politicians in Washington, D.C., it’s another day to grapple with the science behind global warming.

What presidential contenders say about science and the climate.

Death-penalty protesters outside of John Joseph Moakley United States Courthouse during the first day of the sentencing phase of the Boston Marathon Bomber Trial on April 21, 2015, in Boston, Massachusetts. Dzhokar Tsarnaev, 21, was found guilty on all 30 counts related to to his involvement in the 2013 bombing, which related in three deaths and over 250 injuries. (Photo by Scott Eisen/Getty Images)

Gun rights have become a culture war. The death penalty has become less divisive.

Obama’s foreign policy: sellout or strategic?

President Obama has moved to cut deals in recent weeks with two enemies of long standing. On Tuesday, the administration said it would take Cuba

The politics of the ‘TIME’ 100 list

On Thursday TIME revealed its annual list of the 100 most influential people in the world – a hodgepodge of business leaders, celebrities and, perhaps

U.S. not backing off use of military contractors

U.S. use of private security contractors has grown sharply in the past 15 years and despite well-documented controversies, such as the most recent Blackwater trial,